Pittsburg Plate Glass Factory

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Factory Floor

Most abandoned factories are associated with loss. Almost every one of them has a similar story: founded in the late 1800’s, profitable until the late 1900’s, and then shut down, leaving behind poverty and urban blight in the communities that once worked them. With this in mind, it’s hard to imagine that the complex of ruined industrial buildings between the Passaic River and a stretch of unused railroad track once belonged to a company that today makes more than one billion dollars annually.

DSC_0648A flooded ground floor in one of the buildings

The Pittsburgh Plate Glass company was founded in 1883, and became the first successful plate glass manufacturer in America. As cars and tall buildings grew more popular throughout the early 1900’s, the company expanded, buying new factories(this one included) and diversifying its products. It became one of the first American companies to expand overseas when it bought a plant in Belgium. In more modern times, the company is responsible for many things we see day to day, from the printing material used in passports to transition lenses.

DSC_0655Rusted Chemical Vats

The history of this particular factory is almost unknown, including when it opened, when it was abandoned, and what it made. My guess, from the number of vats, pipes, and the environmental investigation sign out front, is that it produced paint, varnish, or some other chemical product.

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I have no idea what these things did

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The inside stairs of the factory are falling apart. Use extreme caution, or better yet, the still intact fire escape outside.

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Most of the floors look something like this

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The roofs of the various buildings are easily accessible and provide a nice view of Newark’s skyline.

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Rusty ladders are often not intact enough to climb, but the ones here were still solid

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Pipes and the skyline

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Will the modern PPG Industries step up to tear this place down? I don’t really think so.

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